Mathematics Book Collection - Diophantine

Mathematics Book Collection - Diophantine

Mathematics Book Collection - Diophantine
English | PDF | E-book Collection | All in One | 500 MB

In mathematics, a Diophantine equation is a polynomial equation, usually in two or more unknowns, such that only the integer solutions are sought or studied (an integer solution is a solution such that all the unknowns take integer values). A linear Diophantine equation is an equation between two sums of monomials of degree zero or one. An exponential Diophantine equation is one in which exponents on terms can be unknowns.
Diophantine problems have fewer equations than unknown variables and involve finding integers that work correctly for all equations. In more technical language, they define an algebraic curve, algebraic surface, or more general object, and ask about the lattice points on it.

The word Diophantine refers to the Hellenistic mathematician of the 3rd century, Diophantus of Alexandria, who made a study of such equations and was one of the first mathematicians to introduce symbolism into algebra. The mathematical study of Diophantine problems that Diophantus initiated is now called Diophantine analysis.

ax + by = 1 This is a linear Diophantine equation.

A general quadratic Diophantine equation in two variables x and y is given by:

The slightly more general second-order equation discussed in Gauss' Disquisitiones Arithmeticae:

Diophantine geometry is one approach to the theory of Diophantine equations, formulating questions about such equations in terms of algebraic geometry over a ground field K that is not algebraically closed, such as the field of rational numbers or a finite field, or more general commutative ring such as the integers. A single equation defines a hypersurface, and simultaneous Diophantine equations give rise to a general algebraic variety V over K; the typical question is about the nature of the set V(K) of points on V with co-ordinates in K, and by means of height functions quantitative questions about the "size" of these solutions may be posed, as well as the qualitative issues of whether any points exist, and if so whether there are an infinite number. Given the geometric approach, the consideration of homogeneous equations and homogeneous co-ordinates is fundamental, for the same reasons that projective geometry is the dominant approach in algebraic geometry. Rational number solutions therefore are the primary consideration; but integral solutions (i.e. lattice points) can be treated in the same way as an affine variety may be considered inside a projective variety that has extra points at infinity.
Mathematics Book Collection - Diophantine

(All below links are interchangable. No password)
Buy Premium To Support Me & Get Resumable Support & Max Speed

Alternate Link for Mathematics Book Collection - Diophantine.rar When above links are dead

Hello Respective Visitor!

Please Login or Create a FREE Account to gain accesss to hidden contents.


Would you like to leave your comment? Please Login to your account to leave comments. Don't have an account? You can create a free account now.